Graduate Students


Janice Tubman

Janice Tubman

Ph.D. Candidate
2008 – Present

I study how Spy1’s role in cell processes, such as invasion and migration, during normal mammary gland development and how it is involved in breast cancer progression and metastasis. I use an in vitro 3D cell culture model as well as an exciting new in vivo 3D zebrafish metastasis model, allowing us to study Spy1 in more biologically relevant systems.


Frank Stringer

Frank Stringer

Ph.D. Candidate
2013 – Present

I am a Ph.D. student with interests in cancer and stem cell biology that include assessing diseased tissues and models of disease using modern microscopic techniques such as multicolour immunofluorescence and tissue microarrays.


Adam Pillon

M.Sc Candidate
2017 – Present

My research project focuses on the protein tuberin, which is a protein in the mTOR pathway that when mutated causes tuberous sclerosis. Specifically, I am interested in the binding pattern between tuberin and the mitotic cyclin, cyclin B1, and their interaction to act as a novel cell-cycle check at the G2/M phase. In addition, I am exploring the effects of the interaction between tuberin and the ERK pathway to better understand its role in tuberous sclerosis. I currently use in vitro methods and fly models to explore both of these aspects of tuberin interactions.


Jackie Fong

Jackie Fong

M.Sc Candidate
2018 – Present

Tuberin is a tumour suppressor that regulates the G1/S and G2/M phase of the cell cycle. My research project focuses on Tuberin’s interaction with the G2/M cyclin, Cyclin B1 and whether this leads to increased stability of the Tuberin protein. In addition, I am interested in whether this interaction aids in DNA damage repair through cell cycle arrest at the G2/M checkpoint. These will be addressed through in vitro methods, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Dissecting this interaction will help our understanding of cell cycle regulation and importantly provide clues to the mechanisms of the tumour disorder, Tuberous Sclerosis.