Graduate Students


Janice Tubman

Janice Tubman

Ph.D. Candidate
2008 – Present

I study how Spy1’s role in cell processes, such as invasion and migration, during normal mammary gland development and how it is involved in breast cancer progression and metastasis. I use an in vitro 3D cell culture model as well as an exciting new in vivo 3D zebrafish metastasis model, allowing us to study Spy1 in more biologically relevant systems.


Frank Stringer

Frank Stringer

Ph.D. Candidate
2013 – Present

I am a Ph.D. student with interests in cancer and stem cell biology that include assessing diseased tissues and models of disease using modern microscopic techniques such as multicolour immunofluorescence and tissue microarrays.


Rosa Maria Ferraiuolo

Rosa Maria Ferraiuolo

Ph.D. Candidate
2013 – Present

After graduating from the University of Windsor in 2009 with a B.Sc in Honors Biological Sciences, I started my Master’s research in Dr. Porter’s lab working on the role of Spy1 in the estrogen receptor and MAPK signalling pathways; focusing mainly on breast cancer. I transferred into the PhD program in 2010, continuing my work on signalling pathways and also working with novel forms of therapies to treat cells that have various levels of Spy1. I have a clinical trial ongoing with Windsor Regional Cancer Center, under the supervision of Dr. Porter and Dr. Caroline Hamm.


Ingrid Qemo

Ingrid Qemo

Ph.D. Candidate
2014 – Present

My research is focused on the role of cell cycle regulation mechanisms in bypassing senescent barriers and implications this may have on cellular reprogramming, stem cells and tumourigenesis in the central nervous system. I study the role of Spy1 in these processes using in vitro colony formation and neurosphere assays as well as in vivo mouse model system.


Jessica Dare

Jessica Dare-Shih, M.Sc.

Ph.D. Candidate
2009 – Present

I am a Ph.D. candidate student who works closely with Dr. Fidalgo da Silva. My research focuses on the unique and transient interaction that Tuberin has with the G2/M cell cycle regulator protein Cyclin B1. We are currently dissecting the details of this unique and novel relationship through a variety of techniques.

Recently graduated with M.Sc. Jan 2016.


Bashaer Khatir

Bashaer Abu Khatir

M.Sc. Candidate
2013 – Present

I am a Master’s candidate. I have done my undergraduate research project in the Porter lab and graduated in 2013. I started my masters shortly afterwards. My project focuses on the role of the tumour suppressor protein, Tuberin, in early brain development in mammals as well as its role in brain stem cell differentiation.